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    Human trafficking increase sees refugee surge on Greek islands

    Aid groups are once again struggling to accommodate a rising number of people arriving on the Greek islands to request asylum. Despite heightened patrols in the Aegean Sea to deter smuggling activity between Turkey and Greece, about 3,700 refugees reached Greek shores in August and about 400 new arrivals have been recorded per week so far this month.

    The recent spike in arrivals is mainly credited to seasonal weather patterns and calm seas, but some monitors on both sides of the Aegean have said the liberation of Islamic State-controlled areas in Syria and Iraq may also be a factor as new refugees arrive in Turkey and head directly to Greece.

    “Many new arrivals are coming from Syria and from cities that were previously under siege,” said Louise Roland-Gosselin, an advocacy manager for Doctors Without Borders (MSF) in Greece. “It’s difficult for us to know for sure where they are from … but this is what people are telling us as they arrive.”

    Full story: http://p.dw.com/p/2k1vt

    Lesvos, Greece © Diego Cupolo 2015

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    Ancient settlement primed for flooding in Turkey

    Crews have begun dynamiting Neolithic-era caves near Hasankeyf, Turkey, an early Mesopotamian settlement that will soon be submerged by a hydroelectric dam project.

    Full Story: http://p.dw.com/p/2iea8

    Hasankeyf, Turkey © Diego Cupolo 2017

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    Striking an Impossible Balance in Turkey

    US Defense Secretary Mattis lands in Ankara today with the impossible task of soothing US-Turkey relations while arming Kurds in Syria.

    Full story: https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2017/08/mattis-erdogan-turkey-isis-syria-kurds/537666/ 

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    Turkey’s AKP rolls back its own reforms

    The AKP still maintains support from about half of Turkish voters and is revered by many for having brought political representation to the nation’s pious citizens, but as Erdoğan takes the stage Monday evening at an anniversary rally in a suburb of Ankara, his party’s legacy is increasingly deemed as authoritarian by opponents and Western observers.

    Full article: http://p.dw.com/p/2iAtT

    Ankara, Turkey © Diego Cupolo 2017

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    Syrian Refugee in Nizip 2 Camp, Turkey

    Nizip, Turkey © Diego Cupolo 2017

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    “Me dressing openly, is not an invitation for you.”

    From headscarves to miniskirts, women in Ankara demanded the right to dress as how they want today.

    Ankara, Turkey © Diego Cupolo 2017

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    Three years later

    Today marks three years since IS took Sinjar Mountain by kidnapping, killing and displacing countless Yazidis. After the fall of Mosul, it’s unclear how many Yazidis will return to their homes. Last year, when I interviewed families living in abandoned buildings, many told me they would no longer stay in the Middle East. “How could we trust our neighbors again?” one asked.

    Shariya, Iraq © Diego Cupolo 2016

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    Anatolian Light

    Ankara, Turkey © Diego Cupolo 2016

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    On the Balkan Route

    Idomeni, Greece © Diego Cupolo 2015

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    As German spat deepens, Turkey draws tourists from elsewhere

    “This is politics, and we can’t do anything,” a hotel manager said. “We just focus on our jobs. Erdogan and Merkel will have to talk it out. We keep our relations with customers, not politicians.”

    Full story: http://p.dw.com/p/2h3Ny

    Antalya, Turkey © Diego Cupolo 2017

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    Kazbegi Landscape

    Mount Kazbek, Georgia © Diego Cupolo 2017

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    Tbilisi Bus Station Market

    Tbilisi, Georgia © Diego Cupolo 2017

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    Prometheus Cave

    Tskaltubo-Kumistavi, Georgia © Diego Cupolo 2017

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    Approaching Ushguli

    Ushguli, Georgia © Diego Cupolo 2017

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    Phanar Greek Orthodox College

    Four years ago, I took this photo in Fener, a historic Greek district in Istanbul. It was my first time in the city and this red-brick Orthodox college caught my attention, seeming distinctly out of place with its surroundings. To this day, I try to catch a glimpse of the building whenever I can. For me, it’s presence over the Golden Horn brings to mind not only the day I decided to move to Turkey, but also the value of contrast.

    Istanbul, Turkey © Diego Cupolo 2013

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    New website is up and running. Finally put together a comprehensive online portfolio thanks to my good friend, Oğul. Feedback welcome.

    www.diegocupolo.com

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    Ankara Aesthetic

    Ankara, Turkey © Diego Cupolo 2017

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    “Tell us to die, we will die”

    Sureyya Kalayci (left) displays a homemade t-shirt stating: “A call is enough. Call us and we’ll come. Tell us to die, we will die.” On 15 July 2016, Kalayci and his son Ahmet (right), blocked military vehicles in Ankara’s streets, helping to foil the attempted coup. “If it wasn’t for the people, the military would’ve taken over our country,” Kalayci said.

    Full Photo Essay: http://p.dw.com/p/2gc2i

    Ankara, Turkey © Diego Cupolo 2017

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    Disparate views in post-coup Turkey

    Among the crowds, were many who personally confronted the military on the night of the coup and had made personal sacrifices to defend the democratically elected government. In contrast, opponents of President Erdogan mostly stayed home, viewing the ongoing purges and Turkey’s extended state of emergency as affronts to the nation’s democratic principles that have undermined the rule of law.

    Full Photo Essay: http://p.dw.com/p/2gc2i

    Ankara, Turkey © Diego Cupolo 2017

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    Turks mark coup anniversary

    Amidst ongoing purges and a year long state of emergency, Turks observed the anniversary of the failed coup with contrasting views of justice and sacrifice.

    Full Photo Essay: http://p.dw.com/p/2gc2i

    Ankara, Turkey © Diego Cupolo 2017

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    Turkey’s purges continue a year after failed coup

    One year after a failed coup sparked nationwide purges on suspected plotters, Turkey’s crackdown continues to spread beyond its initial target of Gulen followers, implicating members of opposition groups, media outlets and humanitarian organizations, effectively silencing many forms of public dissent.

    Full story: http://p.dw.com/p/2gVqW

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    With every step forward, our influences take shape

    Dipilto Viejo, Nicaragua © Diego Cupolo 2011

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    Spoke about the significance of Sunday’s Justice Rally in Istanbul, Turkey, this morning on the BBC World Service. Thanks for having me.

    Audio: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p057l3gv

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    Challenges in Unifying the Opposition

    To keep the momentum following the march for justice, CHP leaders said they would need support from a wide spectrum of opposition groups, some of which have been disenfranchised or ignored by the party in the past. CHP is the legacy of Turkey’s founder, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, and has long based itself on strict secularism and a singular Turkish identity - which has not always represented the nation’s many minorities.

    Full Story: http://p.dw.com/p/2gEYw

    Istanbul, Turkey © Diego Cupolo 2017

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    Turkey’s ‘March for Justice’: opposition calls for unity, reform

    When asked if the possible suspension of EU accession talks could have an impact on the ruling Justice and Development Party’s (AKP) policies, Kilicdaroglu told DW the “decision will tear Turkey from the civilized world.” Yet, at the same time, he said responses to political oppression must come from within Turkey, and that outside pressure may prove counterproductive.

    “It will not have an impact,” Kilicdaroglu said during an interview inside his caravan in Gebze. “On the contrary, [the involvement of the international community] will increase polarization and this will benefit of Erdogan’s party.”

    Full story: http://p.dw.com/p/2gEYw

    Istanbul, Turkey © Diego Cupolo 2017

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